Glasnost Not Actually Correct

I finally got a result from the Glasnost server after several unsuccessful attempts, but it’s unfortunately not correct:

Is BitTorrent traffic on a well-known BitTorrent port (6881) throttled?

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2 out of 2 BitTorrent transfers were
interrupted while uploading (seeding) using forged TCP RST packets.

It seems like your ISP hinders you from uploading BitTorrent traffic to our test server.

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The BitTorrent download worked.
Our tool was successful in downloading data using the BitTorrent protocol.

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There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits your BitTorrent downloads.
In our tests a TCP download achieved minimal 2079 Kbps while a BitTorrent download achieved
maximal 2147 Kbps. You can find details here.

Is BitTorrent traffic on a non-standard BitTorrent port (4711) throttled?

*
2 out of 2 BitTorrent transfers were
interrupted while uploading (seeding) using forged TCP RST packets.

It seems like your ISP hinders you from uploading BitTorrent traffic to our test server.

*
The BitTorrent download worked.
Our tool was successful in downloading data using the BitTorrent protocol.

*
There’s no indication that your ISP rate limits your BitTorrent downloads.
In our tests a TCP download achieved minimal 2135 Kbps while a BitTorrent download achieved
maximal 2126 Kbps. You can find details here.

Immediately before and after this test I seeded a Torrent successfully, at a rate in the range of 30-40 K Bytes/sec. So I know seeding is possible on my connection, but Glasnost claims it isn’t. This is not a cool tool.

Still no answers to my questions, despite a promise to have some by Friday.

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4 Responses to Glasnost Not Actually Correct

  1. Ted says:

    So I know seeding is possible on my connection, but Glasnost claims it isn’t.

    That’s not what the report you posted says. It says that forged TCP reset packets were sent. Is that incorrect?

  2. The report implies that seeding is blocked – “2 out of 2 BitTorrent transfers interrupted.” In fact, no BitTorrent transfers were interrupted, they were only delayed. A TCP stream does not equate to a BitTorrent transfer.

  3. George Ou says:

    Wow, I didn’t think the data would be that bogus. If they’re claiming 2 out of 2 uploads are blocked, you shouldn’t be able to seed. Yet you’re able to seed perfectly fine with BitTorrent. This definitely puts the entire test results in to question.

  4. Wally says:

    Another aspect of the trial worth noting is that the testers appear to have turned off the BT feature that automatically retries a reset connection, something George has commented on in his writings. Thus, every transfer the Max Planck Institute attempted that received a reset packet automatically was registered as a “block” even though, if Max Planck had allowed BT to retry the connection, it may have proved that the upload was merely delayed rather than “blocked.”

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